South Korean named Interpol president in blow to Russia

This undated official photo taken from the Russian Interior Ministry web site shows Alexander Prokopchuk, Russian Interior Ministry general who's currently an Interpol vice president. Kremlin foes including financier Bill Browder, Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Alexei Navalny have warned that naming a top Russian police official to the job would undermine Interpol. Russian Interior Ministry spokesman Irina Volk on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018 lashed out at critics, accusing them of running a "campaign to discredit" the Russian candidate Alexander Prokopchuk. (Russian Interior Ministry via AP)
In this Jan. 23, 2018, photo, Kim Jong Yang, the senior vice president of Interpol executive committee, speaks during a press conference in Changwon, South Korea. On Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2028, Interpol elected Kim Jong Yang as its president in a blow to Russian efforts at naming one of their own. (Kang Kyung-kook/Newsis via AP)
In this image made from video, Kremlin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky, right, and financier William Browder attend a joint press conference in London, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018. Kremlin foes including financier Bill Browder, Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Alexei Navalny have warned that naming a top Russian police official to the job would undermine Interpol. Russian Interior Ministry spokesman Irina Volk lashed out at critics, accusing them of running a "campaign to discredit" the Russian candidate Alexander Prokopchuk. (AP Photo)

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — South Korea's Kim Jong Yang was elected as Interpol's president on Wednesday, edging out a longtime veteran of Russia's security services who was strongly opposed by the U.S., Britain and other European nations.

Kim's election was seen as a victory for the White House and its European partners, who had lobbied against Alexander Prokopchuk's attempts to be named the next president of the policing organization.

The U.S. and others expressed concern that if Russia's candidate had been elected, it would lead to further Kremlin abuses of Interpol's red notice system to go after political opponents and fugitive dissidents.

Russia accused its critics of running a "campaign to discredit" their candidate, calling Prokopchuk a respected professional.

Kim's win means he secured at least two-thirds of votes cast at Interpol's general assembly in Dubai on Wednesday. He will serve until 2020, completing the four-year mandate of his predecessor, Meng Hongwei, who was detained in China as part of a wide anti-corruption sweep there.

Kim, a police official in South Korea, was serving as interim president after Meng's departure from the post and was senior vice president at Interpol.

Russia's Interior Ministry said after the vote that Prokopchuk, who is one of three vice presidents at Interpol, will continue his role in that position.

Most of Interpol's 194 member-countries attended the organization's annual assembly this year, which was held in an opulent Dubai hotel along the Persian Gulf coast.

Interpol was facing a pivotal moment in its history as delegates decided whether to hand its presidency to Prokopchuk or Kim, who were the only two candidates vying for the post.

Based in the French city of Lyon, the 95-year-old policing body is best known for issuing "red notices" that identify suspects pursued by other countries, effectively putting them on the world's "most-wanted" list.

Critics say countries like Russia, Turkey, Egypt, Iran and China have used the system to try to round up political opponents, journalists or activists, even though its rules prohibit the use of police notices for political reasons.

The agency faced criticism two years ago when Interpol's member-states approved Meng as president for a four-year term. Amnesty International has criticized "China's longstanding practice of trying to use Interpol to arrest dissidents and refugees abroad."

In 2016, Interpol introduced new measures aimed at strengthening the legal framework around the red notice system. As part of the changes, an international team of lawyers and experts first check a notice's compliance with Interpol rules and regulations before it goes out. Interpol also says it enhanced the work of an appeals body for those targeted with red notices.

Still, member countries can issue requests, known as diffusions, directly to other countries using Interpol's communication system, without going through the centralized Interpol vetting that's in place for red notices. Watchdog groups have urged Interpol to reform the diffusion system too.

Bill Browder, who runs an investment fund that had once operated in Moscow, says Russia used the diffusion system against him, which led to his brief arrest in Spain earlier this year.

Browder and another prominent Kremlin critic warned Tuesday that electing Prokopchuk— who has ties to President Vladimir Putin— would have undermined the international law enforcement agency and politicized police cooperation across borders. Prokopchuk was in charge of facilitating Interpol warrants on behalf of Russia.

A day before the Interpol vote, the White House came out publicly against the election of Prokopchuk, with National Security Council spokesman Garrett Marquis saying "the Russian government abuses Interpol's processes to harass its political opponents." He said the U.S. "strongly endorses" Kim.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Washington was encouraging all nations and organizations that are part of Interpol to choose a leader with credibility and integrity. "We believe Mr. Kim will be just that," he said.

Russia, however, secured a win for its ally Serbia on Tuesday when Kosovo's bid to join Interpol failed to garner enough votes at the general assembly in Dubai. The move would have boosted Kosovo's efforts at recognition of its statehood. Kosovo declared independence from Serbia in 2008.

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Charlton reported from Paris. Associated Press writer Nataliya Vasilyeva in Moscow contributed.

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